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21st December 2017

Veteran Tree Management Standards available for public comment

 

VETcert, the project seeking to develop a certification scheme for those who work with veteran trees, reaches another milestone. In November, veteran tree enthusiasts from across Europe descended on Gilwell Park, London for a five day workshop aiming to fine tune the veteran tree management standards ready for public consumption.

The Ancient Tree Forum are responsible for producing the veteran tree management standards for the project. To guide the production of these standards a questionnaire was circulated in early 2017. A strong response to the questionnaire was received, with 288 people taking the time to complete the survey.

The focus of the workshop was to discuss and revise the standards ready for a public consultation. ATF chair, Russell Miller, was on hand to chair the meeting and steer us through the five days of discussions which included topics such as existing veteran tree standards, good and bad management practice, prerequisites of entry to VETcert, what level the standards should be aimed at, and the content of the standards.

Whilst working on improving the standards, there were opportunites for partners to discuss the finer points of veteran tree management and share knowledge. Frequent field trips were made to neighbouring Epping Forest to facilitate discussion and confirm understanding. The meeting was held in English, however there were six nationalities present, all of whom did an amazing job discussing a detailed standard in a second, or even third, language; I think it is fair to say that our European partners put the English representatives to shame with their language skills.

At the end of the five days we were left with a set of draft standards ready for public comment. There are two standards, one for practicing professionals (tree surgeon/forester) and one for consultants. Each standard is split into 11 units covering the wide range of skills and knowledge required for veteran tree management:

  • Veteran trees; recognition and values.
  • Growth, development and dysfunction of trees.
  • Roots of veteran trees and the soil environment.
  • Veteran trees as ecosystems.
  • Veteran trees and people.
  • Veteran tree survey and assessment.
  • Legislation in relation to veteran trees.
  • Veteran tree risk management.
  • Veteran trees, urban planning and infrastructure.
  • Personal skills.
  • Veteran tree management.

These standards can be found on the VETcert website (http://www.vetcert.eu/standards-certificates), along with a SurveyMonkey questionnaire for providing feedback. The consultation is open to anyone with experience of managing veteran trees and will run until 31st January 2018.

A big thank is due to our VETcert partners, as well as all of those who have expressed an interest in the project or taken the time to provide their input.

Further updates will be provided until the project comes to a close in August 2019. If you have any queries about VETcert please contact Jim Mullholland, Training and Technical Officer, at training@ancienttreeforum.co.uk

Posted by: Jim Mullholland Jim is the Ancient Tree Forum's Training and Technical Officer. He has a background in ecology and arboriculture, and has worked as a tree officer. He has a particular interest in veteran trees and bats.

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23rd November 2017

Book review: Ancient oaks in the English Landscape

David Lonsdale reviews Aljos Farjon’s book about how the oak tree has shaped the English landscape over the past thousand years.

Connections between past land use and the present-day distribution of ancient trees are the central theme of this book by Aljos Farjon, a botanist and author who is renowned for his work on conifers and who, in retirement, has turned his attention to ancient oaks.

Contributors to the Ancient Tree Inventory have recorded thousands of ancient trees in the UK.  Aljos Farjon hit on the idea of using this information in order to explore in detail the relationships that were already known to occur between the distribution of England’s ancient oaks and the history of land use.  By personally recording trees at many sites and by studying documented site history, he has confirmed the strength of these relationships, while also creating a very readable and fascinating book.

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Posted by: David Lonsdale David Lonsdale is a consultant, author and lecturer, with a lifelong fascination for ancient trees. He is the editor of the Ancient Tree Forum's book 'Ancient and other veteran trees: further guidance on management'

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22nd November 2017

Launch of ATF London

Nev Fay

Kensington Gardens

Greg Packman, an arboriculturalist with the Royal Parks, writes about the recent launch of ATF London held at Kensington Gardens in October.

The meeting started off outside the Kensington Gardens park office where we had an introduction from Simon Richards, Park Manager of Richmond Park and Head of Park Operations for The Royal Parks. Through his role at Richmond Park with its 1000 plus ancient trees, Simon has worked closely with many from the ATF over the past 20 years so was the ideal person to introduce the first meeting. After a brief introduction from myself and then from London Tree Officers Association Chair, John Parker we set off for the first veteran tree.

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Posted by: ATF London The ATF London group will be running regular field events in and around London. For more information email Greg Packman, at gpackman@royalparks.gsi.gov.uk.

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To Brotherswater with ATF Cumbria

Ben Garish of HDDN media

Walking through pasture towards Dovedale

Clare de Villanueva, Cumbria Woodlands Project Officer, and member of the ATF Cumbria group, writes about their recent visit to Brotherswater

It was a chilly, misty autumnal day, beginning with an exciting approach for me via the Kirkstone Pass. An excellent turn out made for some serious parking challenges, which were negotiated well by Ian Jack (leader of the ATF Cumbria group). The visit to Brotherswater had been inspired by Cumbria Woodlands’ ash project, which is looking in part at ancient and pollarded ash. The day was hosted by Liam Plummer of the National Trust, and we were also joined by a lichenologist and a film maker.

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Posted by: ATF Cumbria

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Recording the ashscape

Hannah Solloway

Hollow ash

This veteran ash tree, with its beautiful heart-shaped form created by cambium curving round the decayed hollow, can be found towards the bottom of a chalk downland valley in North Dorset.

With its hollow trunk, deadwood in the crown, rot holes and cavities, the tree has many veteran features and is hugely valuable for its biodiversity as well as its aesthetic appeal. It supports many species of lichens and bryophytes, some of which are almost entirely dependent on veteran ash trees, due to the unique characteristics of the bark. These include the (UK) priority lichen Bacidia incompta, and the nationally scarce Bacidia delicata and Caloplaca ulcerosa. The white-rot wood decay in the trunk provides decaying woody habitat for a range of saproxylic invertebrate species.

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Posted by: Hannah Solloway Hannah is the Development Officer for the Ancient Tree Forum.

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14th November 2017

Ancient oaks in Somerset

Chris Knapman

Castle Neroche oak

Forester Jon Burgess, of Forestry Commission England, writes about the Piddle Oaks, which the ATF Devon group visited during their field event at Castle Neroche in Somerset last Autumn.

On top of the hill overlooking the Taunton Vale, in an landscape surrounded by ancient earthwork fortifications, hidden deep within the wood are a wonderful collection of ancient oaks. As with all things this old there remains a bit of a mystery about the history – were they on the edge of the royal hunting Forest of Neroche, or within a separate park pale that survived after the forest was broken up?

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Posted by: ATF Devon The ATF Devon group, one of the longest-established local ATF groups, runs trips to sites across the county and nearby to see ancient and veteran trees. email devon@ancienttreeforum.co.uk for more details.

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9th November 2017

ATF Wessex visit to Longleat

David Blake

The Grove, Longleat

David Blake, who leads ATF Wessex, writes about the group’s Autumn visit to Longleat in Wiltshire

On the morning of 20th October, a few of us were logging on to the BBC Weather web page and wondering if we were going to be lucky or not. For some months, Julian Hight, Jim McConkie, Hilary Abbott and myself had been working on a plan to bring off the third Wessex ATF event. We particularly wanted this one to have a varied audience and, if possible, a larger audience than usual. We were lucky: the weather god did us proud.

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Posted by: David Blake David Blake is Project Development Officer for the Cranborne Chase Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, and leads the ATF's Wessex group.

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19th October 2017

Rewilding and the Knepp conference lectures

Knepp Castle Estate

Grazing cattle at Knepp

Jamie Simpson, who carries out arboricultural work at the Knepp Estate in Sussex, writes about the rewilding of Knepp, the influence of Frans Vera, and the Vera Conference at Knepp: ‘Freeing the Landscape: Grazing animals as ecosystems engineers’ (see link to presentations below).

The introduction of free-roaming grazing herbivores, extinct animals and a return to less interventional land management is commonly known now as ‘Rewilding’. It has been a hot topic amongst nature conservationists, land managers and farmers since the publication of Grazing Ecology and Forest History by Frans Vera in 2000 and more recently, promotion in mainstream journalism by George Monbiot.

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Posted by: Jamie Simpson Jamie is an arboricultural and woodland management contractor solely for nature conservation. He also works part time at Knepp Castle undertaking a wide range of tree work, and at Buglife as the Ancients of the Future project officer.

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9th August 2017

ATF Wessex: Managing visitors and veterans in Wiltshire

Jim Mullholland

Jim Mullholland joined the ATF Wessex group for a field event in June to Southwick Country Park, a site much-visited by local people, to see how the veteran trees are managed.

Nestled on the outskirts of Trowbridge, Southwick Country Park is an impressive veteran tree site which can easily be overlooked. Along the former agricultural hedgerows the veteran oak pollards are becoming lost in forests of newly planted trees.

The country park was purchased by Wiltshire Council in 1989 with a view to developing a golf course. At that time strips of trees were planted to frame fairways and develop a number of holes within the loose agricultural field framework. When plans for a golf course didn’t continue, the land was instead used to create a country park for local residents.

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Posted by: Jim Mullholland Jim is the Ancient Tree Forum's Training and Technical Officer. He has a background in ecology and arboriculture, and has worked as a tree officer. He has a particular interest in veteran trees and bats.

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8th August 2017

Raising standards in arboriculture – the development of VETcert

Planning the VETcert project at the Tortworth Chestnut

The project seeking to develop a certification scheme for those who work with veteran trees is well underway. In June the VETcert partners met in Gloucestershire at an event hosted by the Arboricultural Association.

On the Sunday in advance of the meeting, the partners were treated to a visit to Crickley Hill led by Simon Cox, Technical Officer for the Arboricultural Association. This was an opportunity for partners to catch up, as well as look at some beech pollards and ancient oaks.

Monday morning started with a trip to the Tortworth Chestnut, led by Jim Mullholland, Training and Technical officer for the Ancient Tree Forum. Jim, who lives around the corner from the tree, explained its history and showed some of the vast collection of lithographs, paintings and sketches the Tortworth Estate company have amassed.

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